Weather Fair 84.0°F (45%)
Wednesday, March 12, 2014 • Posted March 28, 2014
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) I moved down to Fort Worth and worked with the telephone company for nearly one year and then I came over to the stockyards to get a job. I walked around the yards awhile and found out where they needed a hand and went to the show sheds and found the gang at work.
Wednesday, March 19, 2014 • Posted March 21, 2014 • Photos
In January, 1925, Levi V. (Lee) Arnold, who grew up as a child in Llano County, Texas on the Colorado River south of Old Bluffton, completed his personal memoirs, mostly about his early life prior to 1900. It seemed to be his intent to share with readers what it was like to be raised on the Texas frontier during tumultuous years that were plagued by Indian hostilities and rampant outlaws.
Wednesday, March 5, 2014 • Posted March 5, 2014
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) That was my last* trail for me and I remained at home a while and went up to Fort McKavett to a dance and had a nice time. They had the dance in an old fort house. It was a nice place to dance.
Wednesday, February 19, 2014 • Posted February 28, 2014
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) The lady had plenty of Christmas cake baked up and just a few of us to enjoy it, but we did and the next morning I saddled up and started on to Old Mexico. The ranch man saddled his horse and showed me the crossing on the Pecos River for it was dangerous and he rode with me for four or five miles out of the edge of some mighty rough country and told me that the Mexican bandits ranged down the river a short distance.
Wednesday, January 22, 2014 • Posted January 24, 2014
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold, written in 1925) We passed through the Indian Reservation on the West side of the Snowy Range Mountains and on to Tula Rosa, New Mexico and there were two Americans there—a man and his wife. They were running a little store there.
Wednesday, January 8, 2014 • Posted January 16, 2014
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) There we saw the wild buffalo running across the stake plains. They looked like they were running through the air. The atmosphere is so light it looks like a movie now days and the next morning, very early, we filled out* water barrels on the sides of the wagons full of water for we did not know what was ahead of us and we raveled on till late in the afternoon and when the sun got over in the west, we spied the big lake.
Wednesday, January 15, 2014 • Posted January 16, 2014
NOTE: The Atkison-Arnold trail drive that began in the early to mid 1880’s from Llano County Texas followed commonly used roads going west to join the original Butterfield Overland Stage and mail routes across Texas. After crossing the Pecos River, the trail turned north into Southeastern New Mexico near present day Carlsbad, continuing to follow the Pecos River. (Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V.
Wednesday, December 18, 2013 • Updated December 24, 2013 10:40 AM
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) The Spaniards had worked the mine, some of them we know, but they quit Spain to go for the Indians, they knew that they would have to go so they got ready to start and happened to think to make a chart that was luck.
Wednesday, November 27, 2013 • Posted November 29, 2013
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) I, (L.V. Arnold) grew up during to* time, to be a reliable cowboy and trail hand on one day the old man came over to the Arnold ranch to see me before I started up the trail to Dodge, Kansas, in the spring with a trail herd of cattle and to ask me if I would go through the Indian villages and search for the little girl.
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 • Posted November 27, 2013
(Extracted from memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) KICKAPOO SPRINGS, FIFTY YEARS LATER: There was a man that ranched out southwest of the Arnold Ranch and he was out at a corral, away from his ranch house, branding some calves, with a young boy with him, helping him. The boy noticed a bunch of Indians circling around on the prairie and the man was very busy, so the boy told him he thought it was Indians, but the man said, no, I think it is cowboys, and the boy kept his eye on th ...
Wednesday, November 20, 2013 • Posted November 27, 2013
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) The news came ahead of them and people met them along the wayside to see them and they made it back to Weatherford, Texas. Uncle Davey found the children's homes and went on to Young County, Texas to his home with his boy and he got home after night and the folks were all asleep.
Wednesday, November 13, 2013 • Posted November 14, 2013
(Extracted from memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) Uncle David came home late in the evening and his folks had washed that day and hung their clothes on bushes near the creek a short distance from the house to dry. Late in the evening, going back to the creek to get them, the old lady and the children and a young lady that was staying there with them, were going down the trail and Lovey White, a small boy was running down the trail ahead of the rest, and the Indians were already ...
Wednesday, October 30, 2013 • Posted November 8, 2013
(Extracted from memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) KICKAPOO SPRINGS, FIFTY YEARS LATER: There was a man that ranched out southwest of the Arnold Ranch and he was out at a corral, away from his ranch house, branding some calves, with a young boy with him, helping him. The boy noticed a bunch of Indians circling around on the prairie and the man was very busy, so the boy told him he thought it was Indians, but the man said, no, I think it is cowboys, and the boy kept his eye on th ...
Wednesday, October 30, 2013 • Posted November 7, 2013
(Extracted from the memoirs of Levi V. (Lee) Arnold written in 1925) Old Uncle Rich Coffey came by the Arnold ranch to get trail hands in Llano County, Southwest Texas, and he hired one of my brothers. He was a good cowboy and he hired a young cowboy, which we had reared along with my brother and several more young men out of the settlement and he got his crowd of cowboys together and started up the Colorado River northwest and there were no more houses to be seen after they go* out of our set ...
Saturday, October 19, 2013 • Posted November 4, 2013
In 1925, Levi Vinyard (Lee) Arnold was in his early sixties when he decided to write his memoirs telling about his life as a young cowboy growing up on the Texas frontier. In spite of his limited education and training as a writer, when the project was over, he had written a lengthy memoir recounting his life’s personal experiences.